asker

Anonymous asked: "Any sufficiently advanced wackness is indistinguishable from racism." - Arthur C. Crunk

yoisthisracist:

I don’t think this is an accurate quote.

iridessence:

tooquirkytolose:

…Has this been done before?

YAAAAS

(via thewomanfromitaly)

Remind me to never read about historical bisexuals ever again

  • Me: Hey, cool, this historical figure seems to have swung both ways
  • Homophobic Historian: THEY WERE STRAIGHT OMFG STOP READING THINGS INTO IT
  • Gay Historian: SO WHAT IF THEY WERE MARRIED SIX TIMES THEY WERE GAY GAY GAY
  • Me: But bisexuality exists and isn't that the most sensible thing to assume if we have actual evidence of them having had both male and female lovers?
  • Homophobic historian: THEY WERE CONFUSED AND IT WAS JUST A PHASE
  • Gay Historian: LA LA LA LA I CAN'T HEAR YOU GAY GAY GAY GAY GAY
  • Me: But Anaïs just wrote about how she wanted to faceplant in this woman's boobs, and Byron jumped from this chick's bed into this boy's pants and then this Mercury guy even self-identified as bisexual--
  • Homophobic Historian: LIES AND SLANDER
  • Gay Historian: GAY
  • Me: For fuck's sake
roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.
Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

oh my god ancient chinese ladies knew where it was at

roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.

Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

oh my god ancient chinese ladies knew where it was at

(via petermorwood)

how to identify “boy” clothes and “girl” clothes

patrocluschironides:

are you a boy? your clothes are boy clothes.

are you a girl? your clothes are girl clothes.

are you outside the binary of boy and girl? so are your clothes.

did someone just tell you your clothes don’t match your gender identity? they are a trashcan and their clothes are trashcan clothes.

(via catesbylily-deactivated20140319)

gaytable:

torontonative:

everydayisaverage:

Seasons according to the North

IT IS THAT DAY IN MARCH TODAY

welcome to that day in march

gaytable:

torontonative:

everydayisaverage:

Seasons according to the North

IT IS THAT DAY IN MARCH TODAY

welcome to that day in march

(via dimir-charmer)

Question:

dimir-charmer:

Do cheerleaders in american schools really wear their cheerleading uniform to classes? I mean, I know cheerleading is like a thing in the states but I always assumed that trope was a movie thing.

???

During football season at my highschool either Fridays or gamedays (I don’t remember) would be “Spirit Days” and everyone wore red and the players would wear their team apparel and the cheerleaders wore their uniforms.

karnythia:

rebeccacohenart:

http://vitaminw.co/culture-society/womens-history-questions-and-facts
Just a fraction of the cool stuff I learned when researching women’s history.

I just wish Bessie Coleman’s features were more distinct.

karnythia:

rebeccacohenart:

http://vitaminw.co/culture-society/womens-history-questions-and-facts

Just a fraction of the cool stuff I learned when researching women’s history.

I just wish Bessie Coleman’s features were more distinct.

(via dimir-charmer)